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Search Results 0 to 37 of about 38 (some duplicates have been removed)
we will be joined by zachary goldfarb. our guests will also include alex gilb. "washington journal" is next. host: good morning and welcome to the washington journal. makers are in washington for the remaining weeks of the lame-duck session. the president is taking his ideas on the road to meet with the public. the white house says toy manufacturer is would be hard hit. republicans are planning meetings with small business owners across the country to force the president to back down on raising taxes on the wealthy. former florida governor jeb bush is gathering policy experts and dedication leader's fourth annual education summit. we covered yesterday's events pick. that's where we begin. mr. bush says the unions are barriers to better schools. how would you fix your school system? we want to get your take on it. also, send us a tweet, post your comments on facebook, or send us an e-mail. we begin with the "washington times headline" -- we want to show you what the former florida governor had to say at yesterday's event. [video clip] >> we need to have a teacher evaluation system
to change washington solely from the inside. that is what the president has always believed, that we need the american people to keep pushing on washington and their leaders. you just cannot transfer this. people are not going to spend hours away from their families and their jobs contributing financially when it is are for them to do it unless they believe in the candidate. all of this, the door knocks, the contributions made, the phone calls made, or because these people believed in barack obama. for candidates who want to try and build a grass-roots campaign, it's not going to happen because there is a list are because you have the best technology. they have to build up the kind of emotional appeal so people are willing to go out there and spend their time and resources and provide their talents because they believe in someone and what they are offering. we are hopeful that many people that helped us this time will end up running for office themselves, are leading nonprofit, or playing enormously valuable roles in their community. again, i think the only reason all this happened on the
-- the teachers including is a great one. the schools in washington, very successful about turning around inner city kids, and the kids in that school have to carry a book at all times. it's neat. funny you mention that. i did a reading at my home town, and my 2nd grade teacher was there. she's like 92 years old. i was signing books, and she said, james, your handwriting is still atrocious. [laughter] >> that's great. talk a little bit about where you see our culture going. you're doing -- >> oh, my god. >> i don't mean in general, but in terms of reading. are we creating a culture of readers, notary -- non-readers, where are we now? >> i think the worst thing that's happening is we're creating a culture where people don't listen. they don't listen to the other side. there's a quote -- i read an editorial in the "new york times" a couple weeks ago, and it had to do with morality's ability to behind -- bind and blind, and, you know, it binds people, you believe in, you know, you believe in whatever you believe in, abortion one way or the other or whatever you believe about entitlements or whatev
. that's the attitude in washington that needs to change. now, virginia, after four years as president, you know me. you know me. so when you're trying to sort through this argument about change, part of what you have to ask yourself is, who do you trust? when you are talking about the economy and policy that is so critical to our future, you've got to ask yourself, who do you trust? you may not agree with every decision i have made -- michele does not agree with every decision i have made. there may be times when you are frustrated at the pace of change. i am frustrated sometimes with the pace of change. but you know i mean what i say and i say what i mean. you know what i believe, you know where i stand, what i said we would end the war in iraq, we ended it. what i said we would pass health care reform, we passed it. when i said we would repeal do not ask do not tell, we repeal that. you know i tell the truth. and most importantly, you know i will fight for you and your families every single day as hard as i know how. so let me tell you, i know what will change looks like because i f
are set to take place this week. in washington today, we heard both sides staking out their positions. here's democratic senator carl levin on "meet the press." >> the key is whether the republicans will move away from the rigid position which has been the grover norquist pledge that they signed that they will not go away for additional revenues. >> the gop rejecting the decade-old pledge. here's what norquist said about cham bliss. >> the commitment that he made to the people of georgia was not to me. it was to the people of georgia that he would go to washington to reduce government spending and reform government, not raise taxes. if he wants to change his mind and become a tax increaser so we don't have to reform government, he needs to have that conversation with the people of georgia. >>> >> and new today, congressman peter king on the controversy. >> i agree with chambliss. if i were in congress in 1941, i would have signed al declaration of war against japan. i'm not going to declare war against japan today. the times have changed. ronald reagan and tip o'neil recognized that i
dime earned by family-owned businesses, the president wants to take back to washington, d.c. i'm in favor of a balanced approach. i'm committed to fairness in american society. but, mr. speaker, i ask you, is the problem that taxes are too low or is the problem that spending is too high? what better than class warfare, mr. speaker. we are better than saying we are going to ask the them to bear the burden while the we been fit. -- ben fifment -- benefit. 320 million of us have to come together, mr. speaker. on tough, tough challenges. challenges that this house has crafted solutions to. these solutions are not easy. these solutions are not pain free. these solutions involve shared commitment from every single american. because as freedom is eroding in this country, every single american suffers. and economic opportunity and economic liberty is expanded in this country, absolutely every american benefits. we can do better, mr. speaker. as a nation we have done better, as the united states house of representatives. and i come here today just to remind my president, the white house
a cushion going into the counties around washington. >> and the more suburban -- obama will get a big a big scor. >> we haven't seen the vote tallies in virginia. and joining us on set is the arcitect -- >> call me "winner" house races? your job was to protect the majority or grow this. is it possible the republicans may net seats? >> we will get them in non- traditional areas. we will get them because we fought hard. this means you get to do a lot of things you wouldn't normally do. one goal of mine, four years ago, was to make sure we were a national party with a national message, to sell thit that way. john boehner backed it up and eric cantor with a great job. >> early numbers from ohio and virginia, you may be one of the few happy republicans in tonigh. >> how do you feel about the washington. >> we put a lot of work into this. the rcc is about winning. cantor and boehner were with us -- winning back twice. you have to prove you can do it. >> for those watching, the congressman runs the campaign committee. controls the money that is spent -- what is one district you will win tonight th
from this morning's "washington journal." don >> he is still resolute in the face of defeat. >> not to see you. sometimes you win. sometimes you lose. >> this is tough. he is a close contender. he has given credit for getting george bush elected in 2000. bbthe supreme court nominated george bush in 2000. since he has been in the white house has been brought about everything. he spent $300 million this year of other people's money. we do not know how much money he made for that deal. in nine senate races he got one win. he has spent maybe $170 million against barack obama and for mitt romney. he had a horrible record. on election night he tried to recreate florida 2000 on fox news by insisting that the network fox was wrong to in calling the election for president obama. the number crunchers said, no, you are wrong. he made a fool of himself. still today he insists he is right. i would hope that nobody would give that guy a dollar to spend in any future election. i think his career in politics should be over. not that i feel strongly about this, but he also has this enormous
against human desire. back cannot work. i am a student at george washington university. there is a large push from the and the price of a community about legalization of marijuana. -- from the undergraduate timidity about legislation and marijuana. could this lead to a nationwide reform movement? >> it is different. i presume the undergraduate movement at gwi is people who want to get something. temperance movement was to deny somebody else opportunity to get something. the women's movement that was the firast mass move apart -- movement for prohibition was very noble. women were victimized by prohibition in horrible ways. women have no voting rights, the bourse was a rarity. -- women had no voting rights, divorce was a rarity. it was an effort to free the family, free women from this. it is hard to get my arms around comparison between that and an undergraduate desire for marijuana. >> most major changes in the country, from popular movements, some of them start on college campuses, some in other places. >> there is a meaningful parallel. it is generational. the same generation that is
of acceptable discussion. it's only in official in washington that this has not been, you know, accepted, and, by the way, i hate to pick the liberals down one more time, but i have never, in my life, heard legalization of drugs talk about in a presidential debate until the first republican primary debit, end of last year or this year, and they got a big round of applause. they did not get through it off the stage. they got laughed at by mitt romney and the rest of them, but you take out the little, what we call in marxist theory, the super structure of the party apparatus, and everybody takes it seriously. maybe the guys will contradict me. >> i prefer taxes on consumption opposed to an investment or anything that creates additional income. i'm not a fan of the drug war so i don't object to it. i'm skeptical of marijuana legalization as a grand deficit reduction strategy. i have to see numbers suggesting it would bring in the types of revenue that we're really talking about, and politically, it will be a very difficult thing to do so i'm not sure -- i'm in favor of it, but i'm not sure it's
. >> caller: thank you. the people are so tired of the fighting in washington. like the one candidate said, if they don't do their job they do not get paid. we, the people come have got to start taking these matters into hands because we are sick of it. and, you know, what i would like to tell john boehner is don't give in to this craziness. this is nothing but craziness. and i watched harry reid yesterday. you know, he talked and he talked and he really said nothing. then he went on about dance, dance, dance and i thought to myself all you do is dance around with these bills that they send. the house will have a bill, they send it to the senate and what does he do? dances around it and never addresses it. >> host: know by partisanship than for you? >> caller: no, absolutely none. then when he left the stage and was walking off, the man -- i feel bad for him that he just can't get it together -- he grabbed ahold of the flag. he was falling. then he grabbed ahold of low wall and at that point i said uh oh that man needs to go home. he's too old to be there. he doesn't do his job and is coll
. >> janet. george washington university school of public health. there was a lot of discussion on women's issues. i am wondering if you can speak to the role of gender in the governing. we are seeing more candidates who are successful in their elections and one state's -- is entirely female. >> kelly ayote. when you have that kind of coalition and the democratic party and that remarkable picture of the congressional committee of all republican and not white men talking about contraception or ever was before the committee at the time, that is an image of perjury is exactly why republicans are having a hard time in connecting with female voters in that gender gap. >> romney did significantly improve among white women. not only did not college white women, but also the college white women. this is the first time the democrats have lost them since 1988. >> there is also of the marriage gap. if you are a married woman, you vote different in different ways. that is another thing the republican party is facing. there is new to an era where you bought your identity rather than your interest. >>
from the outside in washington. simultaneously, there's something else under way this morning within the republican party saying we have to change. we cannot go on like this because we keep narrowing the base, and there are a lot of republicans, very senior republicans who have had success in the past and looked at that primary procedure and saw that as a prescription for what happened last night. they were running a retro campaign in the 21st century when things have changed, and the obama people were running a pote modern campaign with technology and looking at the diverse electorate we now have. >> some people say republican soul searching, other republicans say it will be civil war. >> no question. paul ryan is a leader of this party. is it that they were not conservative enough? the reality is mitt romney won a near historic portion of the white vote in america, and he suffered a very bad loss. that's because the country looks different. it has changed. the party has got to find a way to reach out to latinos, the fastest growing voting bloc to become a more diverse party with th
shift. i remember when i came to washington in the 1980s, people were writing an article, i wrote an article for -- i wrote an article for -- remember that carline bowman -- was that public opinion? >> yeah, yeah. >> on the block, the electoral law, that there was a republican electoral law. i think you'll probably start to see people talk about a democratic electoral lock due to these changing demographics. so the hispanic numbers picked up, and we are seeing an electric whether democrats democrats are doing well among african-americans, hispanics, asians, younger voters and white liberals. and that, that needle appears to have moved slightly to the democrats so that if you have a kind of normal base election, the democrats have a very slight advantage. i think most people will say we will continue to grow over time, unless the republicans do something to make inroads among what now are becoming some poor democratic constituencies, at least some. but if you look at the house races, you have to be cautious about the big message you are drawing. if the democrats again what looks to
it. >> get over what? what are you talking about? >> all of you are in here. in washington, msnbc and "time" magazine senior political analyst, mark halperin. >> richard's in here? >> i don't know why. i'm serious. what's going on? also, look at this cast we have today, the author of "thomas jefferson, the art of power," historian jon meacham. is meacham here? meacham, look at him. >> lots of books. >> and willie, congratulations on your newest honor. >> thank you. are you in nashville, jon meacham? >> i'm in washington. going to be in nashville tomorrow. >> he needs a pipe in that setting. >> yes, he should, and a fireplace. >> you're saying donny's milking this thing. >> we talked about it for ten minutes. we got on the set and donny's, like, can we do this again today? >> unfortunately, joe and i are on what's called the decaying page. guys falling apart. we're on the presidential page. >> you look good. >> right next to brad pitt. >> that kind of ruins it. okay. well, there you go. >> okay, take that down, please. >> oh! >> there we go. >> it's too early for this. >> it is. ta
, woman and child in greece. today voters could make washington state the first state to make and use and sell marijuana. you would have to be over 21 to buy over a licensed dealer. the federal government can challenge the legality. >> brian: candidates, convincing the american people is half of the battle. they have to convince 535 memberings of congress to take their side, too. who better to do the job. back to the political panel who experienced that for themselves x. first of all for the middle of gridlock, how do we break it can they do. >> if romney gets elected you start with a new day. the republicans would try to move something forward and if the president gets reelected you start where you are today with a lot of the grid lock. >> brian:ent senator baye. you said no one was doing anything. do you see it changing if president obama gets another four years. >> i think he will think about his legacy and there is a chance and he will probably move to the middle and embrace the simpson-bowles report and make compromises with the entitlement reform. my guess he would be willing to
, it is pressure from the outside of washington. simultaneously, there is something else under way this morning within the republican party saying that we have to change. we cannot go on like this, because we keep narrowing the base, and there are a lot of republicans, very senior republicans who have had success in the past who lookedt that primary procedure and saw that as a prescription to what happened last night. they were running a retro campaign in the 21st century when things have changed and the obama were running a post-modern campaign with technology and the diverse electorate. >> some republicans say a soul searching and other republicans say civil war, david. >> no question that paul ryan is a leader of the party. were they not conservative enough? the fact is that mitt romney won a historic portion of the white vote in america and suffered a bad loss, because the country has changed and looks different. they have to become a more diverse party with the ability to shed some of the orthodoxy around taxes, around spending, over the role of government. and this process is going to beg
in bellingham, washington, good afternoon. please go ahead with your question or comment for steven johnson. >> caller: hi, pleasure speaking to you. 8, i was a first wave environmental planner back in the mid '70s, so i'dhead of your ghost -- i'd heard of your ghost maps story. and in -- after i graduated i thought i'd kick around the idea of architecture plus ecology and play with computer models and satellite data late at night without authorization. [laughter] before the term hacker or geospatial intelligence technology was invented. anyway, i became a mr. mom in '82 because that was really going nowhere. today, however, it looks like, you know, cloud technology and c factor computing and a lot of these breakthroughs are going to make three dimensional environmental computing feasible. the problem i saw then was a global vision in a flat world, you know? we didn't really have a three dimensional philosophy. to work with this new technology. and i don't even see it there now. and it's kind of a little troubling, you know? any comments, thoughts? thanks. >> guest: yeah, great. what an int
in the senate, which is contrary to what anybody in washington, i think, thought, even as late as labor day. we know the house is going to stay roughly the same. absent breaking news, i bring you no precinct returns from florida. i'd like to spend more time on why this is happened, and what that means for us going forward. first, i share the admiration all around for president obama's campaign team. they were tech nickically close to perfect in the first responsibility of a campaign team, that is to identify and turn out voters. they planned it. they executed it. every step of the way, they knew what votes they needed, got out and got them. they began weeks before election day banking favorable votes in states where they had already had people on the ground preplabbed to produce. again, technically, a superb operation, one to set the standard for future campaigns and now you identify your voters, encourage them to turn out, and perhaps some people think by the fourth or fifth visit or phone call verging on harassment to turn themçó out, t it worked. the point i want to make beyond that, howev
and republicans hold the house, washington on the morning after is going to look very much like washington the day before. >> of course, nicolle wallace who worked in the pal in/mccain campaign four years ago, george w. bush, the huge issue, overwhelming issue, the economy. that is the issue that mitt romney wanted to make his calling card. >> that's right. they are looking at the same information we're looking at as people are still voting, you know, they're hoping that's what they had in mind when they went to the polls day. they made a sales pitch that was 100% about voters being dissatisfied with the pace of recovery. that was the beginning, middle and end of mitt romney's pitch to the american people and they're on the same pins and needles we are to see if it worked. >> donna brazile, one thing we saw, the exitle pos and a surprise to me in the exit polls if we can pull it up now, we asked about the direction of the country and one thing that it showed, donna brazile, who worked for campaign manager for al gore back in 2000, a dramatic reduction over the last year in people who think the cou
. in the suburbs of washington. fairfax county and next door in prince william county. in 2008 in the counties president obama did well against mccain. 61% to 389%. in fairfax. prince william, louden, 54-vi. the president will need to do well there. he has to do well there to run up the vote total and make up for romney strength in south and west of virginia. watching virginia very closely when the polls close. >> well done. >> a state that is critical is virginia. i went for president obama in 2008, but romney needs it. mike emanuel live in richmond. good evening. >> election officials describe turn-out as robust and ahead of 2008 levels. experts predicting the record turn-out in the range of 4 million voters. with long lines across virginia that could be achieved. republican vice presidential nominee paul ryan made one final visit to virginia. the richmond area this afternoon. just hours before the polls close at 7:00 p.m. ryan told campaign staff and volunteers this is are a great effort. they should keep it up. wake up tomorrow morning knowing they did evening they could in virginia. for r
it comes to building different and better coalitions in washington, finding his own versions of moderate republicans to come with him. the question is, did he learn lessons if he wins a second term? and maybe are there better ways of building coalitions outside of washington, trying to go to certain places and certain states and trying to overperform in certain states. >> if he wins on tuesday night, he was able to get support because of things he did, killing bin laden, helping out hispanic kids brought to this country at an early age, these are things he did, the thing he did with governor christie the other day, these are actual doing things. >> i think the lesson is, if he wins one of the top two or three factors will be the auto rescue. that is key to ohio. if he keeps ohio, it's because of the automobiles and the fact that you can see automobiles on the street. you can see chrysler and dodge cars on the street. that's tangible and that is probably his best piece of tangible legislation. >> the one thing that you're getting at here, chris, what smir conish found out the hard way, th
of light rain in washington state. election day, we're looking good. now let's talk about the nor'easter and the effects for everyone devastated by sandy. first off, the coldest morning yet this fall season and the coldest morning since the hurricane, windchills are in the 20s right now. as far as the storm evolution, let's put it in motion and watch it coming up the north. watch the clock moving to the right. as it heads to the north, the rain shields off the coast. possibility of snow from philadelphia to trenton, up to the jersey shore, rain down around southern new england. what this all means is a little further off the coast, the winds would be a little bit weaker right along the shore. but we do have the possibility of seeing snow now in the areas hit by sandy. i think we'd take that, couple inches of wet, sloppy snow, no further irs for the power outages. again, good news as far as the nor'easter's concerned. you're watching "morning joe." more continuing coverage from democracy plaza, we're brewed by starbucks. no, no, no, stop! humans -- one day, we're coming up with the
of change, of course not produced the change in washington that he promised in 2008. still, he said his critics are vetting the people turned off by the partisanship of the past four years and depress the voter turnout and he rallied people to go to the polls, here is a bit of what he had to say. >> and that's why i need you, ohio to make sure their voices are heard, to make sure your voices are heard. i want to keep fighting for you, and we've come to far to turn back now. >> the president in mentor, ohio, tomorrow, in columbus, ohio, and we'll see you there. back to you in new york. >> steve: thank you very much. one of the things the president's team the thing that the president has for him is his likability. back in august the president of the united states was 50's oon mitt romney was 40's. according to the brand new washington abc poll, mitt romney and barack obama are currently tied in exactly the same likability. >> gretchen: you could attest to the debate performance for mitt romney would be the first indicator, probably the first one and the president has gone negative and tha
in washington and certainly talk a lot about that during the conference, but i think the focus right now has to be dealing with this fiscal cliff and putting the competitive agenda in place and if we don't do that i believe that we will not be able to get the kind of economic recovery that we all hope for and that we have been lacking over the last few years. >> let me ask another question. i want to get to the agenda but address at least one more question about the campaign and the republican coalition and that is young people. a lot of discussion in the press the last week or so that you didn't make as many as you thought you would despite the fact a lot of them are living at home and there's not a great job market for them and the president still has about 60% of that vote. is this partly a cultural issue message? is gay marriage for example one of those threshold issues now that makes the republican party look out of touch with those voters? and you have to change that gave republicans talk about that issue? >> yeah. [laughter] >> that's a very big concession because a lot of the colleag
in washington with mitt romney wh who is going to work with your governor, work with your senator to do the things that will get more jobs for ohio. get this economy turned around and get those people back to work instead of having a trillion-dollar welfare economy that nobody is happy with. >> let's talk about your home state of virginia, coveted prize certainly for both candidates. what makes the romney campaign think that they can capture virginia at this point? >> well, we are leading in virginia with independents, just like we're leading in ohio and everywhere, and in virginia, we're very concerned about, first of all, the president's tax increases are going to hit our economy, just like they're going to hit ohio very hard. families and small businesses will really get crushed. we have a big high-tech industry in virginia. the tax increases will hit our small businesses at the same time -- >> let me interrupt you here, because virginia unemployment is among the lowest in the country at 5.6%. so how will you come bt thbat t? >> we observed with president obama did and did the absolu
washington post" was asked about the decision, do you approve of the decision to keep open the guantanamo prison for terror suspects. 70% of the american people who answered that survey said yes, we approve of it. i want people to understand who we're talking about transferring from guantanamo bay to the united states of america. understand the individuals and some of their backgrounds who are being held at guantanamo bay, coming to a neighborhood near you. this is, of course, the mastermind of september 11, khalid sheik mohammed who is being held at guantanamo bay. he's often called k.s.m., he's described as the mastermind of the 9/11 attacks. he claims to have personally decapitated american journalist daniel pearl in 2002 and committed to playing a part in 30 terrorist plots, including a 1995 plot to blow up 12 u.s. airliners flying from southeast asia to the united states for which he was indicted the following year, 1993 world trade center bombing, a plot to hit towers in chicago, new york, los angeles, and nuclear power stations. he claimed he was involved in a plot to assassinate p
Search Results 0 to 37 of about 38 (some duplicates have been removed)